Records Tumble But Everyone’s A Winner

15 Sep 2020

Records Tumble But Everyone’s A Winner

Ethan Brouw, with a time of 1:53.50 in the Open 800 metres; Jack Greaves, who threw 61.88 metres in the 16 years javelin; Sebastian Ghisso, who set a new mark of 10.94 seconds in the 15 years 100 metres and Luca Gillard, who broke the 14 years record for 3000 metres, running 9:01.00.

Lending credence to the theory that athletes compete primarily against themselves, Trinity students have set a swag of personal bests and School records, even without the incentive of CAS and national titles.

Of the 96 boys competing in the school championships at Sydney Olympic Park on Saturday, some 90 achieved personal bests and four set school records to breath inspiration into the pandemic-hit season.

“It was a fantastic turnout and a phenomenal achievement, considering there was no carrot for them at the end,” said CAS track and field manager Liz Murphy.

“They were really competing for themselves, and they were desperate to compete.

“They showed the motivation, drive and culture in our program.

“Initially they were really disappointed (at the cancellation of major titles) but what impressed us was they way they rose above it and didn’t dwell on it.

“They still turned up to training in the cold and wet, even during exams.

“They showed such a good work ethic and mindset. That’s why our boys are some of the best in Australia.”

The record breakers were:

  • Ethan Brouw, with a time of 1:53.50 in the Open 800 metres;
  • Jack Greaves, who threw 61.88 metres in the 16 years javelin;
  • Sebastian Ghisso, who set a new mark of 10.94 seconds in the 15 years 100 metres;
  • Luca Gillard, who broke the 14 years record for 3000 metres, running 9:01.00.

Track and field director Andrew Murphy said in a normal year around 20 athletes would have gone on to compete in the national titles, adding: “That’s huge from one school.”

The titles continued the momentum generated by last year’s victory in the CAS championships and Trinity’s crowning as top school at an international meet in Croatia.

Head Master Tim Bowden said the performances bore testimony to the quality of the school’s athletes and the program led by Andrew Murphy and Liz Murphy in “this frustratingly truncated season”.

“It was wonderful to see so many of our young men delighting in the opportunity to run, jump and throw,” he said, “demonstrating the progress that they have made over the last 12 months through training and growth.”