Homelands

All are welcome to attend the opening of our first exhibition “Homelands” at Delmar Gallery tomorrow (31 January at 3.30pm running until 1 March).

As well as viewing the exhibition, you can meet the artists and hear an opening address at 3.30pm by Mr Simon Chan. Mr Chan is Director of Simon Chan & Associates Architects, a firm he established in 1987. In 2009, he founded Art Atrium Gallery to exhibit contemporary Australian, Asian and Aboriginal art with a special focus on cross cultural collaboration and expression in art. He was the recipient of the inaugural NSW Premier’s Multicultural Award for Arts & Culture (2013). He is also President of the Haymarket Chamber of Commerce, Vice President of the Australian Chinese Community Association and Co-Principal Sponsor of the Paddington Art Prize.

The works in the exhibition range from symbolist charcoal drawings and a graphic novel by Anton Pulvirenti, telling the story of the artist’s Italian grandfather’s internment during WWII; a poetic, short film by Zheng Zheqing about his quest to make sense of a new culture and place, acclimatising to Sydney as an international student; to a monumental sculpture by Ingrid van der Aa representing the artist’s Dutch and Australian identities.

Also included are impressive drawings by Abdullah M. I. Syed, layered prints by Lucienne Fontannaz and sculpture Merryn Hull. The six artists have either just completed or are finishing PhD and Masters degrees at the National Art School, Sydney College of the Arts and UNSW Art & Design. Abdullah Syed exhibits regularly in New York, Karachi and Dubai, and has participated in many group exhibitions since moving to Sydney five years ago. Lucienne Fontannaz, Merryn Hull and Ingrid van der Aa have had previous careers as a curator, architect and counsellor respectively. Anton Pulvirenti is one of the last practitioners of the art of Sicilian cart painting and is represented by Dominik Mersch Gallery, Sydney. Zheng Zheqing is practising as an artist in Shanghai.

View exhibition catalogue


  • January 31, 2015